Flash Flooding – August 4, 2021

Flash Flooding – August 4, 2021

A lot of rain and afternoon thunderstorms are typical of the summer monsoon season here in Colorado. Monsoon? In Colorado? When you hear the word monsoon, you probably think of the heavy rains in India during the summertime. While The North American monsoon is not as...
Produce from the Past – July 28, 2021

Produce from the Past – July 28, 2021

Here in the Northern Hemisphere during these hot summer days, a lot of us are eating delicious produce like watermelon, peaches and corn-on-the cob. These days, there’s lots of chatter about GMO concerns (genetically modified organisms), but every species that’s ever...
Flooding in Europe – July 21, 2021

Flooding in Europe – July 21, 2021

A few days ago, record rainfall caused rivers to burst their banks, leading to devastating floods in parts of western Europe. In the hardest hit parts of Germany, two months’ worth of rain fell in 24 hours, according to Deutscher Wetterdienst, Germany’s meteorological...
Ethnobotany – July 14, 2021

Ethnobotany – July 14, 2021

Today’s Science Wednesday is a guest post from French anthropologist, Dr. Benjamin Pothier, with a focus on enthobotany. While anthropology is the scientific study of humanity, concerned with human behavior, human biology, cultures and societies, in both the present...
Fire & Ice – July 7, 2021

Fire & Ice – July 7, 2021

Located along the 40,000-kilometer-long mostly underwater Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) is one of the most volcanically active places in the world: Iceland. The ridge is the meeting point of the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates, and, as the two tectonic plates...
Extreme Heat – June 30, 2021

Extreme Heat – June 30, 2021

The Pacific Northwest of North America has been experiencing unprecedented heat these last few days. But “unprecedented” doesn’t even do it justice. Statistically speaking, this is shaping up to be a once in a 1000-year occurrence – and that’s in a normal...
Faces in the Stone: June 23, 2021

Faces in the Stone: June 23, 2021

This past weekend, Ricardo and I were in South Dakota. While there, hiking the highpoint (Black Elk Peak – 7,242 ft./2207 m), we were also able to visit nearby Mt. Rushmore – my first time seeing this national memorial. The size of the faces carved into the rock is...
Mars on Earth – June 16, 2021

Mars on Earth – June 16, 2021

Guest post by Dylan Dickstein: Astronaut analogs are unique and incredible opportunities to jump into new worlds and challenge your ability to remain productive and level-headed while living in isolation with limited resources. This past April, The Explorers Club...
Zombie Fires – June 9, 2021

Zombie Fires – June 9, 2021

Did you know that, deep below the snowpack during the winter, wildfires can still smolder? It’s pretty rare – but these overwintering fires do happen! Typically, when forest fires are put out, they stay out. They don’t survive cold, wet winters. But in boreal forests...
The World’s Northernmost Satellite Station – June 2, 2021

The World’s Northernmost Satellite Station – June 2, 2021

Up in the Arctic, 650 miles from the North Pole, there appears to be a landscape dotted with 100 giant golf balls, all cued up and ready for a game. But, in fact, this is the home of SvalSat, the northernmost – and one of the largest – satellite stations in the...
Nyiragongo Erupts – May 26, 2021

Nyiragongo Erupts – May 26, 2021

It’s Science Wednesday! This past Saturday (May 22), Mount Nyiragongo in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in central Africa erupted for the first time in nearly 20 years. This active stratovolcano stands 11,385 feet tall (3470 m) and has a main crater about 2...
Brood X Cicadas – May 19, 2021

Brood X Cicadas – May 19, 2021

It’s Science Wednesday! If you live on the east coast of the United States and have been outside recently, you may have noticed a peculiar sight and sound in the air – loads and loads of male cicadas are singing their siren songs through vibrations of their tymbals, a...
New Normals – May 12, 2021

New Normals – May 12, 2021

Last week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released new climate normals for the US. So, what does this actually mean? A climate normal is a 30-year average of measurements from weather variables like temperature and precipitation from...
Stories in the Sand – May 5, 2021

Stories in the Sand – May 5, 2021

In last week’s Science Wednesday, I covered the geology that created the Gulf of California and Baja California. This week, I want to share some photos from a particular island in the region: Isla San Jose, home to some stunning geology, particularly at a place called...
Baja, California – April 28, 2021

Baja, California – April 28, 2021

There are few places on the planet that are true paradise – that not only provide stunning scenery but incredible diversity of life, microclimates and geology. Baja California Sur – the state in the southern part of the larger Baja California Peninsula...
Surging Glaciers – April 21, 2021

Surging Glaciers – April 21, 2021

(Science Wednesday is posted early due to some upcoming travel): On the north side of Denali, North America’s highest peak, the Muldrow Glacier has been moving unusually fast: as much as 90 feet/day! What is causing this? It’s called a glacial surge which is a...
When Lightning Strikes – April 14, 2021

When Lightning Strikes – April 14, 2021

Life on Earth originated billions of years ago. While there was likely plenty of water and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to work with – essential ingredients for life – most of Earth’s phosphorus was locked up in insoluble rock, making it impossible to...
Ingenuity – April 7, 2021

Ingenuity – April 7, 2021

It’s Science Wednesday – and it’s an exciting time in the realm of planetary science! On February 18, 2021, NASA’s Perseverance rover landed on Mars in order to explore the Jezero Crater. The primary mission is an astrobiological one: to identify environments capable...
The Science of Procrastination – March 31, 2021

The Science of Procrastination – March 31, 2021

So, I should probably be working right now….but….   What is it that makes us procrastinate? Is it because we’re lazy? Or does it have roots in our evolutionary development? As Dr. Tim Pychyl, a psychology professor states, procrastination “is not a time...
New (Volcanic) Life in Iceland – March 24, 2021

New (Volcanic) Life in Iceland – March 24, 2021

It’s Science Wednesday! For several weeks, Icelanders had been bracing themselves for a volcanic eruption of some sort, given the island recorded more than 50,000 recent earthquakes! A few days ago – on March 19 – a new fissure (linear volcanic vent through which lava...